Inverter speed control over KCP.

  • when adding I/O through devicenet:
    1. make sure to have correct wiring (terminators at ends, bus need to be powered, drain grounded at one point...)
    2. choose baud rate which is supported by all slaves
    3. assign node address (aka "macid") to each slave (usually dip switches or dials)
    4. edit DevNet.INI (set same bus baud rate for MFC, list all slaves)
    5. edit IOSYS.INI (enable driver, in case of MFC it is DN2DRV; map I/O)


    mapping I/Os can be tricky sometimes so if you have more than one slave, add them one at a time (steps 4 and 5)

    1) read pinned topic: READ FIRST...

    2) if you have an issue with robot, post question in the correct forum section... do NOT contact me directly

    3) read 1 and 2

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  • Hi Skyfire,
    Slave device to the scan list, mm...what is that?


    KRC I/O config works in layers.
    The programs access the internal I/O table -- the $INs, $OUTs, and $ANINs and $ANOUTs.
    IOSYS.INI controls which communications drivers are active, and which bytes on the fieldbusses are connected to which $IN/$OUT signals in the internal I/O table.
    DEVNET.INI, after it is activated by IOSYS, sets the baud rate and contains the list of slave devices that the DeviceNet driver searches for and takes command of.


    DEVNET.INI

    Code
    [krc]
    debug=0
    baudrate=500
    
    
    [1]
    macid=5


    The MACID setting needs to match the address set on your VFD. For most DeviceNet slaves, this is set using a DIP switch bank or a pair of dial wheels. Some DeviceNet devices automatically set their baud rate to match the master, others need the baud rate manually set using similar DIP switches or dials. You'll need to check the documentation for your VFD to determine exactly how your device needs to be set up.


  • Is there any example in the PDF I can use as reference?
    Maybe a simple setup using ANOUT to dim a LED, something simple to understand.



    if you are going to listen to me, you should ask (very) specific questions (and in this order - no skipping...!):
    1 - how to wire devicenet network (power, shielding, topology,...)?
    2 - how and where to use terminators?
    3 - how to enable DeviceNet driver?
    4 - how to configure DeviceNet slave (do you know node address and bus speed of your drive, and where to change it)
    5 - how to configure DeviceNet master (scanlist - edit DEVNET.INI)?
    6 - how to map I/O (do you have telegram format for your drive, should be in the drive documentation)?
    7 - how to test I/O (how to use I/O monitor, this allows you to force outputs)?
    8 - how to program? (AFTER, everything above works!)


    use this as a checklist and report which parts (if any) are definitely solved. pictures you posted yesterday show that MFC is not even wired. step1 is not done...!?

    1) read pinned topic: READ FIRST...

    2) if you have an issue with robot, post question in the correct forum section... do NOT contact me directly

    3) read 1 and 2

  • all bus type networks are same (DeviceNet, ProfiBus, CompoBus, CC Link, DH+, RS485,...), in other words you have:
    - cable (all nodes connect to it). if you have more complex system you may choose use trunk/drop etc but unless you have darn good reason, this is to be avoided.
    - two terminating resistors (one at each cable end), in case of DeviceNet, terminators are resistors 121 Ohm, 1%
    - shield connected to GND in one point only
    - DeviceNet also has power leads which need to be connected to 24V. in kuka cabinets you may see "24V" but this is really 27.1V (raised to charge pair of 12V batteries). not all devices can deal with this increased voltage so read the specs of whatever you power from here or - add 24V power supply that is really 24V.



    normally you will want to see something like this:

  • I checked the Wago Devicenet 750-346 the orange plug below:



    the red=24V and the far left black wire is 0V,

    there are 2 black wire on each terminal of 24v and 0v of the orange plug which are extended to 24V and 0v of the power terminal at the bottom of the device net:

    Do I need a resistor on the Orange Node?

  • You have to have one resistor on each end of the cable, approximately. In general, find the two plugs that are furthest apart on the cable and put one resistance on each one. It looks like you have two resistors on one end, which is no good (unless you're putting them in parallel to achieve the correct impedance -- I can't read the color codes in that photo). In your case, assuming the VFD is the only device on the bus besides the robot, you should have one resistance in the robot, and one at the VFD.


    The idea is "impedance matching" -- you need to have matching impedances on both ends of the network to reduce noise from signals reflecting up and down the length of the cable.


    So, you need a grand total of two --no more, no less!-- 110-ohm resistors, one at each end of the DeviceNet cable. As a general rule, once you have the longest run of DN cable terminated at each end with resistors, you can add short branches off the cable almost anywhere, without adding any additional resistors. If you unplug the DN cable at every node, and run an Ohm-meter check between the blue and white wires, you should have right around 55-60 ohms. Anything more than about 10% off that value is probably going to cause issues.

    Edited once, last by SkyeFire ().


  • The resistors on the green Terminal Blocks are Red Red Brown Gold that is a 220ohm 5% per resistor so in total that is 440ohms
    http://www.digikey.com/us/en/m…ors/4-band-resistors.html
    Those resistors were there already, I will replace them to 110ohms on each side of the terminal block and check the resistance with voltmeter tomorrow.


    thanks,



    connecting two 220 Ohm resistors in parallel is equivalent of using single 110 Ohm resistor
    1/R = 1/R1 + 1/R2


    if the resistors were in series (which they are not), then combined resistance would be 440 Ohm.


    DeviceNet specification calls for 121 Ohm, 1% resistors.

    1) read pinned topic: READ FIRST...

    2) if you have an issue with robot, post question in the correct forum section... do NOT contact me directly

    3) read 1 and 2

  • Sorry, my calculation was wrong not 440ohm is 110ohms in total.
    I went to the electronic shop today, but could not find 121ohms only 120ohms, this should be ok, right?


    add 120ohms to bothe termianl blocks:



    Measure across blue and white wire with ohm-meter:


  • Does this mean I can proceed to number 2? or is it already covered?


    2 - how and where to use terminators? Is this the part where resistors are added?
    3 - how to enable DeviceNet driver?
    4 - how to configure DeviceNet slave (do you know node address and bus speed of your drive, and where to change it)
    5 - how to configure DeviceNet master (scanlist - edit DEVNET.INI)?
    6 - how to map I/O (do you have telegram format for your drive, should be in the drive documentation)?
    7 - how to test I/O (how to use I/O monitor, this allows you to force outputs)?
    8 - how to program? (AFTER, everything above works!)

  • yes,


    how about your slave, what is it, what is the node address, baud rate setting, what is the configuration (I/O size or installed modules)?

    1) read pinned topic: READ FIRST...

    2) if you have an issue with robot, post question in the correct forum section... do NOT contact me directly

    3) read 1 and 2

  • Google searched on Wago 750-346:


    A brief introduction on how to use the dip switches:





    the switches in wago Devicenet are set to 1,3 and 8 on Wago bus coupler, will confirm it this


    afternoon.

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