June 19, 2019, 03:39:34 AM
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 How to calculate Time Taken by each PTP command

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July 31, 2014, 12:27:53 PM
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ravi.joshi53


Hi,

My KRL program consist of several PTP, PTP_REL etc commands. I wanted to know the time taken by kuka while moving from point a to point b.
How to do it?

-
Thanks

Today at 03:39:34 AM
Reply #1

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July 31, 2014, 12:41:27 PM
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SkyeFire

Global Moderator
That's not very predictable.  Many variables come into play -- tooling mass, inertia, programmed speed, overall speed, approximation at each point, etc.  There's a reason that simulators that can (almost) accurately predict these motions are Very Expensive.

July 31, 2014, 01:21:07 PM
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Metalikooky


You'd like to know ahead of time how long the motions WILL take or you want to know after the motions are completed how long they HAVE taken?

July 31, 2014, 02:23:24 PM
Reply #3
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ravi.joshi53


Metalikooky,

See I have written KRL program, which works fine. Once it runs, I wanted to know how much time each move has been taken. Suppose There are some PTP and CIRC motion from point A -> B -> C -> D. After KUKA executes the entire code is there any way I can get to know these taken time?

SkyeFire,

Each PTP motion takes some time to move from one point to another point. I agree with your concerns also. Currently I am using my stopwatch and manually keeping track of these times, which is not accurate but it gives me some idea. I thought that may be we can use KRL to do the same.


July 31, 2014, 03:39:00 PM
Reply #4
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SkyeFire

Global Moderator
Oh, I thought you wanted to PREDICT the time.  Okay, this is simple enough.

Use some TRIGGER commands to reset, start, and stop one of the built in system $TIMERs.  This will give you a total time in ms.

July 31, 2014, 03:46:52 PM
Reply #5
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ravi.joshi53



SkyeFire, It would be easier if you can provide sample code of it, capturing the time taken individually by 2-3 PTP commands.

July 31, 2014, 06:58:08 PM
Reply #6
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panic mode

Global Moderator
you can use timers:

Code: [Select]
WAIT SEC 0
$TIMER[1] = 0
$TIMER_STOP[1] = FALSE

; do something here


WAIT SEC 0
$TIMER_STOP[1] = TRUE
MsgNotify("Process lasted %1 ms","User",$TIMER[1])
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Today at 03:39:34 AM
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August 03, 2014, 04:15:20 PM
Reply #7
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hermann


Code: [Select]
...
trigger when distance=0 delay=0 do start1() prio=-1
trigger when distance=1 delay=0 do $timer_stop[1]=true
ptp target1 c_ptp
trigger when distance=0 delay=0 do start2() prio=-1
trigger when distance=1 delay=0 do $timer_stop[2]=true
ptp target2 c_ptp
ptp target3 c_ptp
....


def start1()
 $timer[1]=0
 $timer_stop[1]=false
end
def start2()
 $timer[2]=0
 $timer_stop[2]=false
end


June 11, 2019, 01:26:55 PM
Reply #8
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Mouhammad



@SkyeFire :
Just out of curiosity, what simulators are you referring to? Could you please name some?

Thanks!

June 11, 2019, 03:33:42 PM
Reply #9
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SkyeFire

Global Moderator
Process Simulate (formerly RobCAD) from Siemens, and Catia (from Dassault) are the two biggest names I can think of.  And they're extremely expensive -- something like $USD 20000 per seat, if not more.  And that's for the basic simulation package -- if you want realistic simulation for timing, speed, path approximation, etc, you have to buy an RCS module specific to each brand.

Then there's add-ons for PLC simlation, creating Digital Twins of entire workcells or production lines... it adds up quickly.

There are cheaper alternatives.  Visual Components is one of the better ones.  RoboDK kind of fills in the lower end of the market, and is the only one I know of that has a free demo version.

And, of course, each robot brand makes their own brand-specific simulator, which is usually the best at simulating that brand's program execution, but lacks the sophistication of large-layout simulation for entire cells and plants.


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